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Goin’ Japanesque!

11 Breads that Developed Independently In Japan and Are Unique Overseas

Featuring Japanese breads! Lately, we hear that there are many people visiting Japan from overseas who fall in love with the taste of Japanese bread. So this time, we selected breads that are unique to Japan and those you may not often see in your home country. They all taste good as well, so if you get the chance to come to Japan, refer to this article and try some for yourself.

 

Characteristics of Japanese Bread

japanese-bread
http://gifumatic.com/

A characteristic of Japanese deli rolls and snack rolls is its sheer variety. The manufacturers cater to the various needs of the consumers. The manufacturer to pick up on very detailed likings of the customers may be an expression of the Japanese characteristic of striving for good service. As a result, the current situation is that there are many bread rolls that have had a unique development in Japan.

japanese-plain-bread
Japanese Bread Loaf, http://food-page.com/

The plain loaf bread is a kind of bread that really expresses the distinct characteristic of Japanese bread. It is fluffy and moist. As in the picture, Japanese bread looks like tangled fibers when being torn apart.  

This is a different concept from the baguette, which can be considered a comfort food for the French. In France, bread is considered a staple. It has a crusty texture and toasty aroma. It is the complete opposite of Japanese bread. Japanese bread is made so fluffy that we sometimes hear that the French do not recognize the Japanese bread as bread. It is because many Japanese prefer this fluffy bread.

 

1. Melon Pan (Melon Bun)

melonpan1
https://www.flickr.com

Lately we see many non Japanese that are in love with the melon pan. It is crusty on the outside, fluffy on the inside and has a melon scent. Melon pan is representative bread that is unique to Japan.

 

2. An Pan (Bun with Red Bean Paste Filling)

anpan
http://panreviews.blogspot.jp/

The an pan is a Japanese bread that has red bean paste filling inside. It is a simple flavor and many Japanese feel nostalgia for the an pan. Many of you may know of it from the Japanese anime, Anpanman.

 

3. Croquette Pan (Croquette Roll)

korokkepan
http://tabelog.com/

Bread with fried foods inside as well; it is so filling that the croquette pan can even be a main dish. You can enjoy a change in flavors by changing the kind of sauce.

 

4. Tuna Pan (Tuna Roll)

tunapan
https://www.flickr.com

The classic deli roll, tuna pan. You can probably imagine what it tastes like because there is the super popular rice ball, tuna-mayo onigiri. It’s even better with chopped onion!

 

5. Yakisoba Pan (Fried Noodle Roll)

yakisobapan
The yakisoba pan has many non-Japanese people wondering, “why?”. It is a staple food within a staple food. FYI, there is also spaghetti pan, lol.
Related: 9 Regional Yakisoba Noodles: Which One Would You Choose to Eat!?

 

6. Katsu Sando (Fried Cutlet Sandwich)

tonkatsu-sandwich
http://sanchokuichiba.com/takumi/

Meat is sandwiched in bread in other countries as well, so this bread may not come as a big surprise. The katsu sando which contains a moist Japanese fried tonkatsu in a sandwich is reputed to be extremely good. Using premium meats like Kobe beef makes it even better. The Japanese may associate this sandwich as a meal on the go, such as when riding on shinkansen.

 

7. Ichigo Sando (Strawberry Sandwich)

strawberry-sandwich
http://pespes55555.jugem.jp/

Yes, we can see this is another one you’ll question, “why?”. The Japanese have a custom of putting fruits in sandwiches. One of the popular varieties is strawberry. The premium sandwich that is sold in conbini these days uses extremely sweet premium strawberries, making it a luxury food. You can tell it’s sweet just from the looks of it.

 

8. Mentai Pan (Seasoned Cod Roe Roll)

mentaipan
http://gachiyurisan.aaafrog.com/

Mentaiko (seasoned cod roe) that the Japanese eat with rice is now placed on a bread roll. It has a salty flavor so it is filling. Perhaps it is similar to the idea of a pizza.

 

9. Okonomiyaki Pan (Okonomiyaki Bun)

okonomiyakipan
http://www.sunny-side.co.jp/

It looks like an okonomiyaki and tastes like an okonomiyaki, and it’s the okonomiyaki pan. We’re sure there are many of you who experienced making and eating okonomiyaki in Japan so it’s probably easy for you to imagine the taste. It is bread that tastes like okonomiyaki so it’s very good.

 

10. Curry Pan (Curry Bun)

currypan
http://b-chopin.com/

Everyone’s favorite, the curry inside a bun! There are countries that eat naan with curry, but the Japanese curry bun is fried so it is crusty on the outside with warm curry on the inside. It may be a new flavor and taste sensation for you.

 

11. Lunchpack

lunch-pack
http://marubozu.exblog.jp/

Lastly, perhaps the most famous of Japanese sandwiches is the lunchpack. Lunchpack is a sandwich that uses bread with the crust cut off. You can taste the fluffy texture that is a unique characteristic of Japanese bread. They are the king of Japanese sandwiches, with over several hundred varieties from those with some interesting fillings and flavors, and some that are exclusive to certain regions.
Related: Lunchpack: The Long Loved Sandwich Style Snack with over 60 Flavor Varieties

 

All the breads we introduced today can easily be purchased at ordinary bakeries, supermarkets and conbini that are located all over Japan. We encourage you to try them! If there are any kinds you fall in love with, any that you weren’t crazy about, we look forward to hearing your comments.

Related: 9 Interesting Character ‘Man’ Buns from Japan

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